Group & Cooperative Learning; Students as Classroom Leaders

Applied Math Activity

Activity: Applied Math Activity

Submitted by Sarah Lams, Applied Math

Goal/s:

  1. To enable students to effectively formulate and communicate mathematical ideas, and to engage with challenging mathematical concepts in a supportive classroom environment.
  2. To gain confidence as mathematical thinkers through practicing math problems in class

Class: AM147 – Applied Math, Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

Mining Shakespeare

Activity: Mining Shakespeare

Submitted by Peter Henstock, STEM

Goal:

  • To introduce students to the basics on natural language processing
  • To utilize clustering and other machine learning approaches in a familiar context and trying traditional and non-traditional approaches to gain insight

Class: CSCI E-81– Machine Learning and Data Mining

Introduction/Background:

Community Service & Education

Activity: Community Service & Education

Submitted by Ariane Liazos, Social Sciences

Goal/s:

  • To better understand the values and assumptions that underlie contemporary models of engaged universities. 
  • To help students develop a fuller understanding of their role as a student, a volunteer, and a member of a larger community.

Class: Social Studies 68ec – Education and Community in America

Introduction/Background:

Complex Stats, Simple Tech

Activity: Complex Stats, Simple Tech

Submitted by Theodore Svoronos, Advanced Quantitative Methods I 

Goal/s:

  • The goal of the activity was to get the students comfortable with understanding the effects of changes on confidence intervals, a concept they had learned about in theory prior to the class.

Class: API 209 – Health Policy

Introduction/Background:

Clinical Trials Smackdown

This activity teaches skills in critical assessment of the peer-reviewed published literature.  It focuses on analysis of clinical trials in mental health, but the principles and methods are readily generalizable to other scientific literature.  The “Smackdown” approach represents an augmentation of the traditional “journal club” mode of teaching critical scientific reading skills.

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