Teacher's eyes only

Structured Field Assignment

Goal/s:
  • To get students out of the “Harvard bubble” and help them learn about Boston’s diverse neighborhoods through conducting and analyzing observations and interviews.
  • To teach students about the ethnographic method, including interviews and field observation.
  • To equip students to be future members of urban communities by teaching them skills to appreciate and understand urban diversity, complexity, and context. 

Class: United States in the World 24: Reinventing Boston: The Changing American City

Introduction/Background: This course introduces students to Boston and the study of urban life through a variety of readings, discussion, guest lectures from practitioners, and visits to four neighborhoods in Boston. Students learn to utilize quantitative and geographical information to understand the city, and to conduct their own research through careful observation and interviews. Students visit multiple neighborhoods in Boston to practice these skills.

Reflection for Fine Tuning

Overview: This reflective activity is designed to provide the instructor with feedback about students’ understanding of course concepts and about their experience with the course.

Class: HGSE T139 Investigating Learning and Teaching Through Close Collaborative Examination of Student and Teacher Work

Goals

To assess students’ understanding of course concepts and their experience with the course

Weather Forecasting

Purpose: The purpose of this assignment is to consolidate knowledge of the weather from class.By making observations and committing to a prediction, it should help you see how weather systems evolve over time. It will also give you a first pass at video making, which will help with the final projects.

We ask that you refrain from looking up weather conditions and predictions for the  period when you are making observations and predictions. Often local observations will be more accurate than the ones found on website.

Advanced Laboratory Class

Joe Peidle developed this class with Melissa Franklin to help expose advanced physics students to apparatuses that they may encounter in a real research lab. Students come into experimental lab sections to perform simple activities with the staff to learn how to use the apparatuses throughout the entire class.

Science and Cooking Labs

Pia Sörensen details how the Science of Cooking class conducts lab assignments through actual cooking experiences. For this example, she navigates through the Molten Chocolate Cake Lab/Heat Lab, but also attached three other examples for more resources. This experiment is supposed to help students understand the concepts of science and cooking in a practical setting by actually cooking or baking with the scientific tools and knowledge acquired through class.

Archive Analysis

Students were asked to produce a multimedia and historical analysis of the archives of Saudi Aramco World. It aimed to bring historical and secondary sources alive by putting students directly in contact with primary, archival sources and asking them to critically engage with those materials.

Cells vs. Buildings

Created by Kostia Bergman, Erin Cram, Wendy Smith, Scott Dobrin, Presque Isle, and Judith Roe, this lesson for an intermediate Cell Biology course encourages students to take a big-picture view of the cell by comparing cells to buildings in order to think about the dynamic processes within cells. The lesson utilizes a jigsaw and quick write.

Understanding the mechanisms of evolution: random genetic drift

Created by Ned Dochtermann, Erin Gillam, Timothy Greives, Kristina Holder, Steve Travers, and Jennifer Weghorst, this lesson focuses on the evolutionary mechanism of random genetic drift.  Students explore how population size affects allele frequencies by engaging in a group activity that involves generating and plotting data, interpreting graphs, and formulating hypotheses.

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