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Speed Networking

With this activity submitted by Jim Grenier from MassBay Community College, students will be able to explain the importance of personal networking and demonstrate how to initiate communication in a one-on-one, face-to-face professional environment. 

Speed Networking

With this activity submitted by Jim Grenier from MassBay Community College, students will be able to explain the importance of personal networking and demonstrate how to initiate communication in a one-on-one, face-to-face professional environment. 

Advanced Laboratory Class

Joe Peidle developed this class with Melissa Franklin to help expose advanced physics students to apparatuses that they may encounter in a real research lab. Students come into experimental lab sections to perform simple activities with the staff to learn how to use the apparatuses throughout the entire class.

Thalidomide: The pros and cons

This case study, contributed by the Cornell Center for Teaching Excellence, is intended to show that two enantiomers can have different effects on the body, and how the same drug can be used to treat different diseases or symptoms.  It is also intended to help students begin to understand the process of FDA approval for drugs.  This problem could be used in an organic chemistry class or in a class for non-science majors.

Speed Dating Elevator Talks

This activity, contributed by the Cornell Center for Teaching Excellence, was created for a graduate communications class to provide students with the opportunity to practice concise description of their graduate research projects.  Students go on "speed dates" to practice giving eloquent blurbs of their research.

Science and Cooking Labs

Pia Sörensen details how the Science of Cooking class conducts lab assignments through actual cooking experiences. For this example, she navigates through the Molten Chocolate Cake Lab/Heat Lab, but also attached three other examples for more resources. This experiment is supposed to help students understand the concepts of science and cooking in a practical setting by actually cooking or baking with the scientific tools and knowledge acquired through class.

Cells vs. Buildings

Created by Kostia Bergman, Erin Cram, Wendy Smith, Scott Dobrin, Presque Isle, and Judith Roe, this lesson for an intermediate Cell Biology course encourages students to take a big-picture view of the cell by comparing cells to buildings in order to think about the dynamic processes within cells. The lesson utilizes a jigsaw and quick write.

The Problem of Scale in Evolution

Created by Jillian Banks, Jeremy Brown, Cindy Gordon, Chris Gregg, Travis Marsico, Chris Osovitz, and Rebecca Symula, this activity focuses on the importance of temporal scale and specifically seeks to resolve the common student misconception that evolutionary change is only observable on a single timescale.  It utilizes index cards in an interactive jigsaw.

Red Light, Green Light: Cell Division and Angelina Jolie

Created by Paul Ogg, Melissa Krebs, Vida Melvin, Amanda Charlesworth, and Melanie Badtke, this lesson teaches how cells regulate cell division using some lecture interspersed with interactive activities including clicker questions, pair/share, and class discussion, applying concepts to Angelina Jolie's BRCA1 mutation.

Shakespeare on Acid: To ionize or not to ionize?

This lesson, created by Graciela Unguez, Erika Abel, Vanessa Castleberry, Rizalia Klausmeyer, Aaron Snead, Martina Rosenberg, William S. Garver, and Marcy Osgood for the National Academies Summer Institute for Undergraduate Education in Biology uses clickers, pair and share, and other exercises to help students "understand the effect of environmental pH on the ionization status of weak acids and weak bases."

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